The VOICE of Anglers and Hunters since 1928

Proposed baiting and hunting changes for migratory game birds

The Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) is currently seeking public feedback on a baiting policy for migratory game birds.

The OFAH does not support ECCC’s recommendations to eliminate bait authorizations and prohibit the modification of agricultural crops. These proposals could have unnecessary negative social, economic, and recreational impacts. First and foremost, there should have been thorough consultation with non-government partners, specifically those hunting clubs around Lake St. Clair who currently rely on these authorizations and practices. Bait authorizations and crop modification are issued primarily for the benefit of migratory birds, particularly waterfowl, through habitat enhancement/creation. Without these practises, we are concerned that some of the lands managed by these clubs could convert back and reduce available staging habitat and nutritional benefits for waterfowl in a region that has already lost most of its natural wetlands. There have been no legitimate sustainability concerns identified, and the issue of social fairness and equitable access to the resource is unjustified and only a speculative concern that is further misinformed by this proposal.

CWS wants your thoughts on these proposed changes before February 17, 2017.  Please state whether you agree or disagree, and list any major concerns and/or suggestions.  Two changes to the Regulations are proposed:

  1. It is proposed to discontinue the issuance of bait authorizations for the purpose of attracting migratory birds for hunting (bait authorizations allow baiting within 14 days of and during the open season);
  2. It is proposed to prohibit the deliberate modification of an agricultural crop that is not part of normal recognized agricultural practices for the purpose of attracting migratory birds for hunting (for example intentionally flooding a standing cornfield).

We are calling on all waterfowlers to have their say. Please share and provide your own comments on the proposed changes by visiting the The Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment and Climate Change Canada website.