First Nation Information.

We’ll work on keeping you updated on any new ALC and Treaty news as it becomes available.

Algonquin land claim – additions to Ontario’s provincial park systemIn Kingston This Week there is a “Public Notice for Processes Relating to Amending Boundaries by Regulation for Two Provincial Parks and a Conservation Reserve”. This refers to Lake St Peter Provincial Park  and the Recommended Whiteduck Provincial Park.

Information on the process can be found by following this LINK

Government Announces New Round of Consultations on the Algonquin Land Claim

It’s been relatively quiet on the Algonquin Land Claim front over the past few years, but negotiations have been ongoing. The land claim covers 36,000 square kilometres in eastern Ontario, an area with more than 1.2 million people and a variety of existing land uses. The final treaty will see the transfer of over 117,000 acres of Crowns lands to Algonquin ownership (the ‘Settlement Lands’) and define the rights of the Algonquins of Ontario related to lands and the use of natural resources in the area.

The OFAH has been following the negotiations for more than two decades, and when a draft Agreement-in-Principle was released in 2012, the OFAH, Canadian Sportfishing Industries Association, and Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Association took to the road to host non-government open houses in many communities throughout the claim area to discuss the impacts.

Recent negotiations have resulted in some changes to the proposed Settlement Lands that were originally proposed in 2012. The new Settlement Lands package contains a variety of provincial Crown lands, roads, access points, and Crown assets (e.g. former ranger camps) that are being proposed for transfer. It also contains amendments to certain provincial park boundaries.

MNRF is seeking comments on the “Supplemental Report to the Draft Environmental Evaluation Report: Proposed Settlement Lands”. The Government is interested in hearing from individuals who have cottages, hunt camps or land use permits and anyone else who recreates in the settlement area and is affected by the transfer of lands. Public consultation on the Report and the Settlement Lands package is being conducted from October 26, 2020 through December 10, 2020. Go to https://www.ontario.ca/page/algonquin-land-claim for all of the information you need.

The Government of Ontario has released the following update on the Algonquin Land Claim negotiations:

July 2020 update

Ontario’s consultation with the public, stakeholders and Indigenous communities, and ongoing negotiations with the Algonquins of Ontario (AOO) have resulted in some changes to the package of Crown lands proposed for future transfer to the AOO.

View the Tanakiwin interactive map to see the proposed changes.

Ontario is currently contacting people who have interests related to the proposed changes, including:

  • interested Indigenous communities
  • those who have existing legal interests on the Crown lands added as proposed Algonquin settlement lands
  • property owners within 120 metres of the new proposed Algonquin settlement lands
  • those with property within 120 metres of Crown lands which were removed from the proposed AOO settlement lands package
  • those with legal interests on Crown lands which were removed from the proposed AOO settlement lands package

This is an interim step in Ontario’s ongoing consultation. We are providing similar information to all parties with interests on the Crown lands proposed for transfer to the AOO.

Broader public consultation on the proposed transfer of provincial Crown land to the AOO will continue as the negotiations proceed. This will include information about the input Ontario received following the 2017 publication of the Draft Environmental Evaluation Report and the publication of a Final Environmental Evaluation Report.

The Agreement-in-Principle signed in 2016 is available for public review. It is based on extensive consultation and feedback on the Preliminary Draft Agreement-in-Principle that was publicly posted in December 2012.

Ontario remains committed to resolving this long-standing Aboriginal rights and title claim through a collaborative negotiation process that features consultation with partners, stakeholders and the public.

 

Algonquin Harvest results.